Category: Farm

Hobby Farm Dreaming

I was delighted to receive a copy of Julia Rothman’s book Farm Anatomy, The Curious Parts & Pieces of Country Life from Storey Publishing.

You may be familiar with Julia’s illustrations, wall papers, notecards and pattern designs. She has been featured on the blog Design Sponge DesignSponge.com and in magazines such as O At Home, ReadyMade, and Domino.

This book is right up my alley. Not only does the subject matter interest me, but it’s a visual treat. Whether she’s discussing plants to use for
natural dye or how to plow a field, Julia relies on illustrations with just a bit of text to convey the information. This makes otherwise complicated
topics pretty darn easy to understand. Makes me wonder why other books aren’t written this way.

Of course, the clincher for me is the spread on heritage turkey breeds. How can I not love a book that includes heritage turkey breeds?

So how about a copy of Farm Anatomy for your library? Post a comment about what you would raise on a farm for a chance to win Farm Anatomy. A winner has been selected. Thank you to everyone who participated! Love the comments!

Check out more of Julia’s illustrations online at
juliarothman.com & read her book blog at book-by-its-cover.com

Excerpted from Farm Anatomy, text and illustrations (c) by Julia Rothman, used with permission from Storey Publishing.

*Winners limited to the continental U.S.

Deer + Drought = Disappointment

Those of you who have a problem with deer might be surprised to learn that they are actually quite particular about something. That something is where bucks like to rub their antlers to remove the velvet. It seems they are especially fond of young, soft barked trees because their antlers are hyper sensitive when the velvet is shedding. Who knew?!

The deer at the farm have been considerate neighbors, but in late spring the heritage apple orchard turned into a popular “rub spot” for bucks. While this gives me something to watch as I sit on the porch, it’s not a form of entertainment I enjoy because it strips the trees of their bark. No good.

The young bucks affection for our apple trees coupled with a terribly dry summer resulted in the loss of several trees and those that survived produced a paltry number of apples. It’s a disappointment, but the garden is a great teacher in rolling with the punches.

If you are having a better apple year than I am I suggest making this rustic apple tart. I made it last weekend with some apples I picked up at the grocery store. I can only imagine how delicious it would be with homegrown fruits. You’ll have to try it and let me know!

Ingredients

  • ½ cup apple juice
  • 3 cups thinly sliced apples (choose a tart variety)
  • ¼ cup light brown sugar
  • ¼ cup agave syrup
  • ½ teaspoon salt
  • ½ teaspoon cinnamon
  • 2 premade piecrusts

Directions

Pour the apple juice into a sauce pan and heat until reduced by half.

In a large bowl combine the apple juice, apples, brown sugar, agave syrup, salt and cinnamon. Toss until the apples are well coated.

Lay one pie crust on a greased cookie sheet and crimp the edges to form a lip.

Spread the apple mixture evenly over the pie crust.

Top with a second pie crust. Pinch the edges to seal.

Sprinkle the top with sugar and cinnamon. Pierce with a fork to make vents.

Bake in a preheated 375 degree oven for 45 minutes or until the crust is golden and the juices are bubbly.

Sad News from the Farm

It’s with a sad heart that I write that our little Jack Russell x Rat Terrier mix (aka Jack Rat) Lucky passed away this week.

He and his sister Angel have been a part of the goings on at the Garden Home Retreat since we began construction. I remember when my brother Chris brought them out to the farm. The exact month escapes me but it was cold. I could fit one in my left jacket pocket and the other in my right. The farm won’t be the same without Lucky leading the charge through the gardens.

 

Up to Our Elbows in Lambs

There are lambs galore at the farm! The little cuties romp around so much we can hardly count them. I think there might be thirty or so. Adorable!

Spring lambs at the Moss Mountain Garden Home.

This little one’s mother died Saturday for no apparent reason. She’s only about a week old so we are bottle feeding her.

Bottle feeding an orphaned lamb.