Fruit or Vegetable?

From a gardener’s perspective a tomato is a fruit. It forms from the ovary of a flower and contains seeds. Therefore it is a fruit.

Now a cook might tell you different because tomatoes are not often used to sweeten a dish. They are served as vegetables so they are vegetables. Right?

Tell me your opinion for a chance to win an awesome Garden Patch Grow Box™ and a packet of ‘Jelly Bean’ and Roma tomato seeds from my Bountiful Best collection from Ferry-Morse Seed Company.

The winner will be announced Wednesday March 7, 2012.*

Congrats to Debbie Chen! She’s the winner of a Garden Patch Grow Box™. We suggest planting it with tomatoes!

*Winner will be selected by P. Allen Smith and his staff based on the merit of their comment. Click here to read the official rules and legal mumbo jumbo.

263 Responses to Fruit or Vegetable?

  1. Johnice says:

    I think the tomato is best described as a savory fruit. When you are dealing with a diet that limits sugars, a fresh ripe tomato offers many benefits of fruit consumption without the concentrated dose of sugar that can ruin a meal for a diabetic.
    one of my favorite ways to have breakfast is a meal of buttermilk biscuits, freshly laid eggs, and a slices of ripe tomato.

  2. Delores Dotlich says:

    Vegetables are classified in different categories; i.e. stems, seeds, bulbs, fruits, flowers, roots (and I think one more!). They are classified according the part of the plant that is eaten, thus, tomatoes having seeds and that is the part we eat, they fall under the category of fruits……one of the classifications of a vegetable.

  3. Diane says:

    A tomato is a fruit, a savory fruit. Fruits do not have to be sweet, like oranges or blueberries to be a true fruit. Strawberries are not fruits, but some types of nuts are. When canning, they are treated as a fruit since they are acidic enough to stand on their own. I call plants what they honestly are, not how they are eaten or what the 19th Century tariff laws or Supreme Court decides. Science wins.

  4. Betty Carter says:

    All my life we called tomatoes a vegetable. This is the first time I ever heard someone call it a fruit. i guess i never thought about it. I don’t consider it being really sweet a little tart sometimes. i always used tomatoes in soups, just sliced or on a blt. i have made a tomatoe pie (which i did’t consider a sweet). i guess you have taught me something today. Thanks for teaching me something new today!!!

  5. Leo Lubke says:

    Technically a fruit (seeds contained within), but I consider it a vegetable as it’s part of a main course, not usually used as an appetizer or dessert.

  6. Ashley McLeod says:

    A rose by any other name smells the same…its a fruit!

  7. Ruth Greene says:

    Living in the south, most of my life, it is a veggie, mainly because
    when we cook with it or serve it, we use it as a veggie!!!
    One can certainly eat it like a fruit (bite into it) but generally we
    slice, chop, stew, or can it. So, I believe it is a veggie, a summer
    time ex-travan-ganza! (with mayo and 2 slices of white bread of course).
    Thanks for allowing me to enjoy thinking about my friend the
    tomato…

  8. Carol says:

    My 3 year old grandchild asked me that very question this week-end. I didn’t want to confuse her so I told her to ask her mother. : )

  9. Theo Haasch says:

    I grow tomatoes in my veggie garden, NOT my fruit garden, t

  10. MIMI AUSTIN says:

    If I’m ever asked or it comes up in conversation I call a tomato a fruit because that’s what you do to show your knowledge; however, all my life I have eaten and loved tomatoes as a vegetable. Either way, tomatoes are added to my diet almost every day! With so many varieties and their versatility how could you not LOVE them!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *


*

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>