Tag: flowers

Nine Flowers for your Vegetable Garden

A vegetable garden without blooms is like a cocktail without a garnish. Flowers aren’t essential in a vegetable garden, but they sure make it better. From a practical stand point flowers work to attract pollinators and add the unexpected to your garden’s design. Plus by combining ornamentals and edibles you’ll maximize your available space.

If you want to mix and mingle vegetables and flowers with success remember, as with all bedfellows, to choose plants with the same growing requirements. Typically vegetables require at least 6 hours of sun each day. There are exceptions such as lettuce, parsley and spinach that will tolerate light shade. Vegetables also need well-draining soil and consistent moisture. There is a huge selection of blooming plants that like full sun as well and benefit from a similar watering routine as their edible companions but always check the plant tags to make sure.

Below are nine plants from my Proven Winners® Platinum Collection that will add the maraschino cherry and twist of lime to your vegetable garden.

‘Cat’s Meow’ Nepeta


Catmint is an excellent companion plant to help keep away flea beetles, aphids, Japanese beetles, squash bugs, ants, and weevils. I also place bowls of the dried blooms on the kitchen counter to deter ants. ‘Cat’s Meow’ will cover itself with blue flowers without much attention from you.
Perennial zones 3 – 8; full sun; upright habit; 17 to 20 inches tall.

Dark Knight™ Lobularia


This low growing plant is an excellent choice to use as edging or mix among salad greens. The fragrant, deep lavender flowers are favored by butterflies and honey bees.
Annual; full sun to partial shade; mounding; 4 to 6 inches.

Supertunia® Pretty Much Picasso® Petunia


Petunias are a helpful pest control plant that repel asparagus beetles, leafhoppers, aphids and tomato worms. These flowers are a delightful blend of hot pink and chartreuse – a real conversation starter.
Annual except in zones 10 and 11; full sun; trailing habit; 8 – 12 inches tall.

Senorita Rosalita® Cleome

20150601_PWSenorita
This cleome is thornless with sterile flowers that don’t produce seeds, which means it won’t spread. The lavender pink blossoms are produced on upright stems. It’s a great plant for mixing with bold-leaved vegetables such as squash.
Annual except in zones 8 – 11; full sun; upright habit; 24 to 48 inches tall.

Supertunia® Vista Bubblegum® Petunia

20150601_PWBubblegum
These hearty petunias will produce mounds of bubblegum pink blooms even during periods of heat and drought. I like to plant them where they will spill over edges and into garden paths.
Annual; full sun; mounding habit; 16 to 24 inches tall.

Luscious® Bananarama Lantana


Butterflies and hummingbirds will gravitate to the clusters of yellow flowers. This is a great plant to take the attention off of a heat weary vegetable garden because it really kicks into high gear during hot weather.
Annual except in zones 10 – 11; full sun; mounding habit; 18 to 30 inches tall.

Supertunia® Black Cherry Petunia


Smoky red blooms shaped like a gramophone horn send out a clarion call to honey bees and other nectar seeking beneficials. The color is lovely when paired with purple basil.
Annual; full sun; mounding and trailing habit; 8 to 12 inches tall; trails to 24 inches.

Lo & Behold® ‘Lilac Chip’ Buddleia


The pollinators love the fragrant, lavender blooms that appear from spring until fall. ‘Lilac Chip’ is non-invasive so it won’t spread through your vegetable garden.
Shrub zones 5 – 9; full sun; mounding habit; 2 feet tall.

My Monet® Sunset Weigela


My Monet® has a compact habit (18 inches tall) that makes it perfect for edging vegetable beds or planting in a container. The foliage transforms from chartreuse to purple to sunset orange as the seasons change.
Shrub zones 5 – 8; full sun; mounding habit; 12 to 18 inches tall.

Flower Arrangements for Spring

Looking for a cure for the winter blues? I suggest a few cut flower stems to get you through the last stretch of cold weather. Most of us don’t have many blooms in the garden right now, but there are a few things to pick (early daffodils, quince, hellebores) and you can bolster your bouquet with flowers purchased from a florist.

Camellia japonica ‘La Peppermint’ from the garden. The short, woody stems are kept in place by inserting them into bit of floral foam wedged into the vase.

A small bouquet of daffodils, Muscari and tulips with purple Loropetulum and heather. A layer of marbles at the bottom of the vase give the short stems height. Daffodils produce a sap that will make other flowers wilt. Before using them in an arrangement keep them in a separate vase for a day and refresh the water every few hours. This will wash away the sap.

I love to hang buckets of daffodils from tree branches. So simple and chic.

Wisteria makes an elegant bouquet. The fragrance only adds to the beauty. I grow American wisteria (Wisteria frutescens) ‘Amethyst Falls’.

Cut glass is a stylish choice for simple blooms like these Summer Snowflakes (Leucojum aestivum) ‘Gravetye Giant’.

Flowers with a Conscience

Are you aware of the efforts by American flower growers to get consumers to think local when purchasing flowers? In addition to the typical reasons for buying local (economy, ecological footprint, and chemical-free) you can expect domestically grown flowers to have more fragrance and appear more natural. Plus they last longer. For instance, with the proper care California roses will last up two weeks versus imported roses.*
Find a local flower farmer.

California Organic Flowers

*Palmer, K (2013, March). Blossoming Close to Home. Minneapolis Star Tribune.

Tabletop Spring Garden

Welcome spring into your home with a tabletop garden planted with spring blooms from your local garden center or grocery store.

Materials:
Potted flowering plants
Plastic baggies
Decorative container
Sheet moss

Directions:
Remove each plant from its pot and slip it, soil and all, into a plastic baggie. This is optional. If your decorative container is large enough to accommodate the plants in their pots, simply slip them into the container. Otherwise the plastic baggies make it easier to arrange the plants.

Once the plants are in the container cover the bags or pots with sheet moss to conceal. That’s it!

For the longest life, place your tabletop garden in a spot away from source of heat. Water the soil with a spray mister.

For this arrangement I used pots of forced ‘Tete-a-tete’ narcissus, primroses and variegated ivy. After the blooms fade I’ll plant the ‘Tet-a-tete’ in the garden. This variety is a prolific multiplier.
The galvanized tray is available in my online shop.

Proven Winners® WaterWise™ Watering Kit

The thing that I love most about gardening is getting my hands in the soil, well almost. Actually I do love abundant beauty that flowers produce, but you know it’s that in between stuff that often gets in the way for a lot of us. Watering for instance. Keeping the soil consistently moist in containers is the key to success, which is why a use a drip irrigation kit. The one I like to use is from Proven Winners and it is so easy to assemble. It takes the work out of watering. With a single kit I can water up to ten potted plants.

Here is how easy it is to set up the Proven Winners WaterWise Container Irrigation Kit.

Attach the backflow prevent valve to your outdoor water faucet. Screw the faucet adapter onto the end of the valve.

Proven Winners WaterWise Watering Kit Fauce Adpater and Nozzle

Push the end of the ¼-inch tubing onto the nozzle of the faucet adapter. This will go on easier if you wet the nozzle first.

Proven Winners WaterWise Watering Kit Tubing Attached to the Backflow Valve and Nozzle

Run the tubing from the spigot to the base of your first container.

Cut the tubing and insert a barbed-tee, which is a little t-shaped piece. Insert the tubing onto the branch of the barbed-tee the points upward. Run the tubing up into the middle of the container and cut to size. Cap off the end of the tubing with a dripper.

Proven Winners WaterWise Watering Kit Dripper Plugs into the End of Tubing

Next insert the tubing onto the horizontal branch of the barbed-tee and extend it over to your next container. Repeat the process until you have all of your containers outfitted with drippers.

Proven Winners WaterWise Watering Kit Barded-Tee Splits the Line So You Can Water Multiple Pots

10 – 12-inch container = 1 dripper
14 – 20-inch container = 2 drippers
24-inch containers and larger = 3 drippers

The tubing is a neutral tan color that disappears among the plants, but you can further camouflage it by inserting it through the drain hole of an empty container before adding soil.

You Can Insert the Tubing Through the Drainage Hole

Depending on the weather and the size of the container you will probably water for one hour each day. Is it is really hot and dry or the container is extra larger you will need to increase the amount of time you water.

You can take all the work out of watering by purchasing a battery-operated water timer to add to the faucet. Now you won’t even have to think about watering.

Purchase a water timer to take all the work out of watering.

Click here to Purchase a Proven Winners WaterWise Container Watering Kit

Each Proven Winners WaterWise kit contains:

  • A 30-foot coil of high-quality tan-colored vinyl tubing
  • Ten 1/2 GPH pressure compensating drippers
  • Ten Barbed Tees (for use in attaching and extending vinyl tubing)
  • Three Barbed Crosses (for use in attaching and extending vinyl tubing)
  • Ten Nail Clamps (for positioning and holding vinyl tubing in place on wood decks or other wooden applications)
  • One Faucet Adapter
  • One Back Flow Prevention Valve
  • Ten Support Stakes (to attach and hold drippers or to train the tubing in place in landscape beds)

Mythological Amaryllis

In Greek mythology Amaryllis was a lovesick shepherdess who stood at the door of her intended every night piercing her heart with a golden arrow. From her wounds sprung an exquisite flower.

Now that’s what I call the hard way to grow these gorgeous blooms. Unlike the Amaryllis in Greek mythology you can grow dramatic blooms this winter without a single puncture to the heart. Simply pot up a few bulbs this fall. With a little water and sunshine you’ll have breathtaking blooms in just over a month.

Here are a few varieties I’m trying this year. I feel certain that if Amaryllis had these to offer her flower-loving beau her fate would have been much rosier.

Amaryllis Dancing Queen

Clockwise from left: ‘Dancing Queen’, ‘Double Dragon’, ‘Blossom Peacock’.

Amaryllis Clown

Amaryllis ‘Clown’

Amaryllis Varieties

Clockwise from left: ‘Aphrodite’, ‘Red Pearl’, ‘Vera’, ‘Elvas’.

 

August Bloom – Salvia

Silent all summer the late-season salvias in my garden are starting to sing this month. Drought-tolerant, long-blooming and vibrant I rely on salvias, or sages as they are sometimes called, to turn up the color volume from August through the first freeze in late autumn.

Salvia 'Sparkler Red'

Saliva 'Sparkler Red', Marigold 'Tiger Eye' and Pineapple Sage 'Golden Delicious'

I love the scent of pineapple sage. This image was shot in October and as you can see the salvias are still showing off.

Salvia 'Wendy's Wish', ColorBlaze Limelife Coleus, and Salvia 'Blue Bedder'

Autumn sage (Saliva greggi)

Mexican Sage 'Santa Barbara' (Salvia leucantha)

Hummingbird sage (Salvia guaranitica)

 

Five Plants that Beat the Heat

Does your garden have hot flashes? Keep it cool with these colorful blooms from my Platinum Collection by Proven Winners® that can take the heat.

Luscious® Citrus Blend™ Lantana – The blooms on Citrus Blend® are clusters of tiny brilliant red-orange flowers with a few yellow ones in the center. It seems the hotter it gets, the more this plant flowers.
Annual except in zones 10 – 11; full sun; mounding habit; 24 to 36 inches tall.

Proven Winners Luscious® Citrus Blend™ Lantana paired with blue verbena.

‘Primal Scream’ Daylily – This award winning variety has spectacular 7.5 to 8.5 inch, glimmering tangerine orange, gold dusted blossoms. It’s a show stopper!
Perennial; zones 3 – 9; full sun to partial shade; 34 inches tall.

Proven Winners 'Primal Scream' Daylily

‘Cheyenne Sky’ Red Switch Grass – A chameleon in the garden. Over the course of the summer the blue-green foliage turns wine red. By the beginning of fall the entire clump is drenched in color. The flower panicles are deep purple. Compact 3 foot height makes it easier to work into home gardens and combo containers.
Perennial; zones 4 – 9; full sun; upright habit; 36 inches tall.

Proven Winners 'Cheyenne Sky' Red Switch Grass

Summerific™ ‘Cranberry Crush’ Hibiscus – A colossus in the Garden! Summerific™ ‘Cranberry Crush’ has extraordinary 7-8″ flowers of dusky burgundy, is a compact grower, and a profuse bloomer even into the fall. Its flowers are irresistible to hummingbirds.
Perennial zones 4a – 9b; full sun to partial shade; upright habit; 36 to 48 inches tall and 48 to 60 inches wide.

Summerific™ ‘Cranberry Crush’ Hibiscus

Lo & Behold® ‘Purple Haze’ Butterfly Bush – Dark purple-blue panicles of flowers radiate outward from this low-growing butterfly bush. The blooms are fragrant and a favorite of hummingbirds and butterflies. Deer resistant and non-invasive.
Perennial; zones 5 – 9; full sun; spreading habit; 36 inches tall.

Lo & Behold® ‘Purple Haze’ Butterfly Bush

 

Enter to win a Proven Winners® WaterWise® container watering kit by telling me which of these five “beat the heat” plants is your favorite. I’ll select a winner using Random.org on Wednesday, July 24, 2013. Use the comments form below to enter. Good luck!

 

Congratulations to Rosa Ghosheh! You are the winner of the Proven Winners® WaterWise® container watering kit! Check your email for a message from us.

 

July Bloom – Daylilies

Daylilies need to come with a warning—these plants can be habit forming! Once you have grown them for yourself, I think you’ll understand why they have such an enthusiastic following.

The genus name for daylily, hemerocallis, was derived from two Greek words meaning “beautiful for a day.” Each bloom lives and dies in the course of a day, but a single plant produces a plethora of buds that flower for weeks. Here are a few that I grow in my garden.

'Joan Senior' Daylily

'Going Bananas' Daylily is part of my Platinum Collection from Proven Winners®

'Mary Todd' Daylily

'Barbara Mitchell' Daylily

'Strawberry Candy' Daylily

'Persian Market' Daylily

Hemerocallis fulva is often referred to as ditch lily because it is found growing wild along the roads in ditches.

'Primal Scream' Daylily is part of my Platinum Collection from Proven Winners®

'Charles Johnston' Daylily

'Red Ribbons' Daylily

'Nosferatu' Daylily

'Night Beacon' Daylily

 

If you love daylilies too, check out the American Hemerocallis Society.

 

Homegrown Wedding Flowers

Click the cover image to read more of Allen's wedding bouquet ideas on AYMag.com.Whether you’re saying “I do” in spring, summer or fall, there are a bounty of blooms that are easy to grow for use in arrangements and bouquets. Here are a few of my favorite, garden stems for these three seasons.

Spring

Daffodils – If you’ve been to my farm, you know daffodils are one of my favorites. Plant the bulbs in the late fall and you’ll enjoy vases full of the yellow charmers as soon as the temperatures begin to warm.

Peonies – Peonies are one of the hardiest and most resilient plants in the garden. What’s more their prime time for blooming starts in mid-May and runs through June—perfect for the wedding season. If you plan to cut peonies from the garden, I suggest selecting half-opened blooms, simply because they will last longer.

Tulips – You can find a tulip in just about any shade and there are a variety of bloom shapes too. Plant bulbs in fall. Check the bloom time for the variety to make sure it will be in flower at the time of your ceremony.

Bouquet Idea
Contrast the cup shape of tulips with the soft curves of calla lilies. I think yellow calla lilies paired with pale yellow to cream tulips would be lovely.

Summer

Hydrangeas – Because hydrangeas are so full you only need a few stems to create a lush bouquet. It’s important to know Hydrangeas do have a tendency to lose their vitality, so you’ll want to keep them in a cool place and give them plenty of water after they are cut. If possible, cut them the morning of the wedding to ensure the freshest bouquet.

Lilies – Lilies will come back year after year and be prolific producers of open full blooms. White Oriental lilies make for an elegant and fragrant bouquet. For the best color selection choose an Asiatic variety. Be sure to remove lily stamens to keep the pollen from getting on clothes.

Zinnias – Plant zinnias and you’ll enjoy a bounty of wildflower-like beauty from early summer until the first frost. I like cutting these and loosely arranging a mason jar for an effortless look. For a bouquet, I suggest tying with natural raffia.

Bouquet Idea
For casual, but colorful flowers mix red, yellow and orange with pink and green zinnias.

Fall

Sunflowers – An iconic symbol of the close of summer and start of fall, cut a few sunflower stalks and loosely assemble with ribbon for a tied bouquet or simply enjoy their beauty in tall metal or glass vase.

Cockscomb – With a vase life of 5-10 days, cockscomb’s modern look makes for a hardy bouquet. Mix with other seasonal selections from your florist or market, such as button mums, for a fall display.

Dahlias – One of the most cheerful blooms in the garden, you’ll want to plant your dahlias around the same time you put tomatoes in the ground. You can expect to have cut flowers from late summer until the first frost.

Bouquet Idea
Any of these blooms would be lovely for a monochromatic arrangement or bouquet. All three offer varieties that produce different bloom forms so you can pick flowers in the same color family, but with different shapes.

Deer Resistant Plants? Fact or Fiction?

Raise your hand if deer like to graze in your garden. How many different tactics have you tried to protect your plants? Have you tried hanging bars of soap from tree limbs, sprayed predator urine or scattered human hair around flower beds?

While these inventive measures may work temporarily, a long term solution requires a holistic approach. First, you have to give up the idea that you are ever going to deer proof your garden. Unless you build a 7-foot tall fence around your place, there’s not much you can do to keep them out. Next, make your garden less appealing to deer. Stop planting their favorites like tulips, roses and hostas and choose plants that deer are less inclined to eat. A few plant characteristics to look out for are fuzzy foliage, an antiseptic aroma and a bad taste.

Are there plants that are 100 percent deer resistant? No. The truth is that deer will eat anything when food is scarce, but if your garden is filled with plants that deer find unpleasant, there is a good chance they will move on to the delicacies in your neighbor’s yard.