Tag: spring bulbs

Twelve Daffodil Varieties to Plant this Fall

If you are looking for the ideal garden flower, you can’t go wrong with daffodils. Once the bulbs are planted in the fall, they emerge and flower reliably each spring for many years with little care. Their cheery, bright blooms illuminate the landscape and announce that winter is over and warmer days are ahead. The deer don’t bother the plants and over time the bulbs multiply so you can transplant them around your garden or share them with friends and family. How’s that for ideal?

The “proper” or botanical name for the plant is Narcissus. But you may know them by one of their many their common names such as buttercup, jonquil and Lent lily. Most people recognize them by their familiar yellow and white trumpet shaped blooms, but they also come in a beautiful range of other colors, shapes and sizes. And by planting varieties that bloom at different times in the spring, (early, mid and late season), you can enjoy several weeks of continuous flowers.

Here is a list of daffodil’s I grow in my garden and you should too.

‘Winston Churchill’
Double flowering
Late
Very fragrant

‘Altruist’
Small cup
Midseason

‘Barrett Browning’
Small cup
Early to midseason
Good naturalizer

‘Ice Follies’
Large cup
Early to midseason
One of my all-time favorites.

‘Minnow’
Miniature
Midseason

‘Perfect Lady’
Early to midseason
Small cup

‘Pheasant Eye’
Narcissus poeticus recurves
Late season

‘Pipit’
Jonquilla
Early season

‘Replete’
Double flowering
Early to midseason

‘Rhijveld’s Early Sensation’
Trumpet
Early

‘Yellow Cheerfulness’
Double flowering
Late

‘Thalia’
Triandrus
Mid to late season

Weed or Wildflower?

Congratulations Jim Wales, Julie N., Sandy Masingillo, Cindy Menn and Martha Wilson! Ya’ll are the winners of the Weed or Wildflower Giveaway. Check you inbox for an email!

Thank you so much to everyone who submitted a comment. What a great response! We’ve got another giveaway coming in Monday’s newsletter so be sure you’re subscribed.

Grape Hyacinth (Muscari armeniacum) is a spring flowering bulb that will easily naturalize. In Arkansas the blooms pop up in lawns along with wild violets, henbit and spring starflower. It’s said that a weed is just a plant growing in the wrong place. So what do you think about grape hyacinths? Weed or wildflower? Tell me your thoughts in the comments section below for a chance to win one of my Bulb Garden decks.

So tell me is this a weed or a wildflower?

Grape hyacinths (Muscari armeniacum) naturalize readily.

*Winners are selected by P. Allen Smith and his staff based on the content of the comment.

We’ve got lots of giveaways coming this year. If you don’t win today, check back for more opportunities! To give everyone a chance contest winners are limited to one win every 3 months.