Tag: summer

August Bloom – Salvia

Silent all summer the late-season salvias in my garden are starting to sing this month. Drought-tolerant, long-blooming and vibrant I rely on salvias, or sages as they are sometimes called, to turn up the color volume from August through the first freeze in late autumn.

Salvia 'Sparkler Red'

Saliva 'Sparkler Red', Marigold 'Tiger Eye' and Pineapple Sage 'Golden Delicious'

I love the scent of pineapple sage. This image was shot in October and as you can see the salvias are still showing off.

Salvia 'Wendy's Wish', ColorBlaze Limelife Coleus, and Salvia 'Blue Bedder'

Autumn sage (Saliva greggi)

Mexican Sage 'Santa Barbara' (Salvia leucantha)

Hummingbird sage (Salvia guaranitica)

 

Five Plants that Beat the Heat

Does your garden have hot flashes? Keep it cool with these colorful blooms from my Platinum Collection by Proven Winners® that can take the heat.

Luscious® Citrus Blend™ Lantana – The blooms on Citrus Blend® are clusters of tiny brilliant red-orange flowers with a few yellow ones in the center. It seems the hotter it gets, the more this plant flowers.
Annual except in zones 10 – 11; full sun; mounding habit; 24 to 36 inches tall.

Proven Winners Luscious® Citrus Blend™ Lantana paired with blue verbena.

‘Primal Scream’ Daylily – This award winning variety has spectacular 7.5 to 8.5 inch, glimmering tangerine orange, gold dusted blossoms. It’s a show stopper!
Perennial; zones 3 – 9; full sun to partial shade; 34 inches tall.

Proven Winners 'Primal Scream' Daylily

‘Cheyenne Sky’ Red Switch Grass – A chameleon in the garden. Over the course of the summer the blue-green foliage turns wine red. By the beginning of fall the entire clump is drenched in color. The flower panicles are deep purple. Compact 3 foot height makes it easier to work into home gardens and combo containers.
Perennial; zones 4 – 9; full sun; upright habit; 36 inches tall.

Proven Winners 'Cheyenne Sky' Red Switch Grass

Summerific™ ‘Cranberry Crush’ Hibiscus – A colossus in the Garden! Summerific™ ‘Cranberry Crush’ has extraordinary 7-8″ flowers of dusky burgundy, is a compact grower, and a profuse bloomer even into the fall. Its flowers are irresistible to hummingbirds.
Perennial zones 4a – 9b; full sun to partial shade; upright habit; 36 to 48 inches tall and 48 to 60 inches wide.

Summerific™ ‘Cranberry Crush’ Hibiscus

Lo & Behold® ‘Purple Haze’ Butterfly Bush – Dark purple-blue panicles of flowers radiate outward from this low-growing butterfly bush. The blooms are fragrant and a favorite of hummingbirds and butterflies. Deer resistant and non-invasive.
Perennial; zones 5 – 9; full sun; spreading habit; 36 inches tall.

Lo & Behold® ‘Purple Haze’ Butterfly Bush

 

Enter to win a Proven Winners® WaterWise® container watering kit by telling me which of these five “beat the heat” plants is your favorite. I’ll select a winner using Random.org on Wednesday, July 24, 2013. Use the comments form below to enter. Good luck!

 

Congratulations to Rosa Ghosheh! You are the winner of the Proven Winners® WaterWise® container watering kit! Check your email for a message from us.

 

July Bloom – Daylilies

Daylilies need to come with a warning—these plants can be habit forming! Once you have grown them for yourself, I think you’ll understand why they have such an enthusiastic following.

The genus name for daylily, hemerocallis, was derived from two Greek words meaning “beautiful for a day.” Each bloom lives and dies in the course of a day, but a single plant produces a plethora of buds that flower for weeks. Here are a few that I grow in my garden.

'Joan Senior' Daylily

'Going Bananas' Daylily is part of my Platinum Collection from Proven Winners®

'Mary Todd' Daylily

'Barbara Mitchell' Daylily

'Strawberry Candy' Daylily

'Persian Market' Daylily

Hemerocallis fulva is often referred to as ditch lily because it is found growing wild along the roads in ditches.

'Primal Scream' Daylily is part of my Platinum Collection from Proven Winners®

'Charles Johnston' Daylily

'Red Ribbons' Daylily

'Nosferatu' Daylily

'Night Beacon' Daylily

 

If you love daylilies too, check out the American Hemerocallis Society.

 

Say No to Nicotine and Yes to Nicotiana

Nicotiana 'Perfume Deep Purple'Today, May 31st is World No Tobacco Day so in honor of that celebration I’d like to tell you about a few Flowering Tobaccos!

Smoking tobacco, Nicotiana tabacum came from the New World and circled out to cultures around the globe. Flowering Tobacco, the cousin of leaf tobacco, is a charming heirloom flower experiencing a Renaissance with gardeners lately. The best part about this ornamental is that it fills the summer garden with large, brightly colored trumpets of star-shaped flowers that attract butterflies and hummingbirds. Many hybrids offer smaller, more compact plants with abundant flowers that bloom throughout the summer.

I also grow Nicotiana sylvestris for its statuesque presence and sweet aroma. It makes a bold statement in my flower borders and frequently comes back as a volunteer. The plant is very fragrant with tubular-shaped, white flowers that dance on 30″ – 36″ tall branched stems during the summer.

Another one to try is Nicotiana langsdorfii because it too grows to an impressive height and I love the waxy, lime green blooms. A third species that I just discovered is Nicotiana x hybrida ‘Tinkerbell’. It is similar in appearance to N. langsdorfii but produces lime green and rose flowers with amazing azure blue pollen.

Try Planting an Evening Garden

I enjoy Nicotiana alata for its strong, jasmine like fragrance at night. Introduced into garden cultivation in the United States and England in the early 1800′s Nicotiana alata was prized for its white, highly scented night-blooming flowers. In Victorian times, Nicotiana sylvestris was intentionally planted along walkways and paths so that those strolling by could enjoy the sweet fragrance of the flowers.

A noted garden writer of the early 20th century Louise Beebe Wilder describes Nicotiana alata as a “poor figure by day … but with the coming of the night the long creamy tubes freshen and expand and give forth their rich perfume and we are then glad we have so much of it…”

I have to agree, I’m a huge fan of all of the Flowering Tobaccos!

Seersucker

Design maven Tobi Fairley is back with this guest post about one of my favorite summer fabrics – seersucker.

Hello Allen’s readers…and hello summer!!

Warmer temps and the relaxed, lazy days of summer call for a cool, casual fabric that can be your go-to for any situation. What am I talking about? Seersucker, of course!

I recently had the opportunity to host an entire party built around the simplistic beauty of this carefree fabric. It’s featured in this month’s issue of Southern Living. You can check out those tips for building a party theme around this popular pattern here, but today I want to share with you a few of the reasons why I have a passion for seersucker.

1. It’s refined — yet, relaxed. In other words, it’s one of the most multipurpose fabrics known to man. I used it to create a beautiful luncheon table, gentlemen don it for the Kentucky Derby, and yet it’s still a beach-bum favorite for shorts and skirts. The classic stripes give it a polished appeal, while the lightweight cotton fabric makes it easy to use or wear!

2. Wrinkles are welcomed. Like I said, it’s relaxed. Part of seersucker’s beauty lies in the “puckers” or characteristic wrinkles you’ll find in the pattern. They are like a great patina on an old weather vane or a wooden fence that has gotten just the right amount of sun. They add character and give the fabric part of its appeal. Plus, there’s no need to iron!

3. Can you say Southern staple? From the Carolina shores to The Grove, you’ll find seersucker being displayed in every Southern state. Whether it’s a monogrammed set of cocktail napkins, a child’s swimsuit or an upholstered settee, nothing screams summer in the South like seersucker. The U.S. Senate even has a day known as “Seersucker Thursday” where all members are encouraged to wear suits cut from this cloth. The tradition is a nod to the days when Senators from the South changed to the lightweight fabric during the warm months, and in turn started a trend that was followed by their friends from the North.

Can you see why I love it so much?? It’s hard not to like something that’s tried-and-true as well as versatile. Leave a comment and tell us how you use seersucker.

Happy summer!

xo, Tobi

[images: Southern Living, Google & StyleCourt.blogspot.com]

Ah, The Good Old Days

Looks like store displays have made the change from vacation fun to back to school. Out with the flip-flops and beach towels and in with the backpacks and spiral notebooks. Yep, there are just a few more weeks for kids to enjoy the freedom of summer and it’s got me to wondering just how their days will be spent. Back in the day you’d have found me hitting the streets with the neighborhood kids looking for something to get into. We were “running wild” as my grandmother used to say.

If I could turn back the birthday clock and be 10 again for a day there are a few childhood joys that I’d find missing here in the 21st century.

  • Roaming freely around the neighborhood without concern. We were out the door in the morning, back for meals and out until bedtime. The words “I’m bored” always got the response, “go outside.”
  • Neighborhood creeks. There was a creek within walking distance of our house. It was a favorite haunt for cooling off and collecting watery things like tadpoles, crawfish and bream.
  • Fireflies. Where did all the fireflies go? Except on a recent trip to New York state I haven’t seen a single one this summer. We used to make lanterns by placing fireflies in Mason jars, which may be why there aren’t any around anymore.
  • Shopping at five and dime variety stores. I used to love to get cleaned up and head downtown with my grandparents to the Ben Franklin or Lay’s. I could spend an eternity browsing through all the treasures and art supplies at these stores.
  • Rear-facing station wagon seats. Claiming shotgun was never an issue when one of these was available. Oh the joy of sitting backwards looking out the big, often open, rear window. It also helped that the back of the station wagon was out of parental reach. Heaven was getting that seat all to yourself on a road trip.

What would you miss from “the good old days” if you were 10 today?