Plant Details

Grape Hyacinth

Muscari armeniacum

Grape Hyacinth

Description

Grape hyacinth are a familiar sight in the spring. The terminal clusters of small bell-shaped cobalt blue flowers resemble and inverted clump of grapes atop the slim green flower stalk.

Planting Tips

Like other bulbs you have to let them go through that essential period of scruffy foliage after flowering so they will bloom again next year. The leaves should not be removed for at least 8 weeks after the last flower fades.

Suggestions

If there ever was a flower that taught me to appreciate the "little bulbs" it would have to be the grape hyacinth. They are versatile, tough and provide shades of blue untouched by any other bloom in the early spring garden. A more intimate inspection reveals a flower of subtle beauty. A tiny bouquet of them is hard to beat, especially with their intoxicating aroma. I learned quickly that you don't plant them, rather you sow them more like seeds. It takes lots of these little guys to make an impact - but watch out, in vast numbers they can really be a knock out. I have planted them as borders in gardens along with candytuft, Iberis sempervirens. If the sometimes tempermental candytuft will cooperate the effect can be stunning. The dark plant contrasted with the clean white blooms of the candytuft is sensational. In my neighborhood of vintage homes you can still find lawns that have not been disturbed by modern hybrid grasses and herbicides. Here the grape hyacinth has naturalized and the flowers are beautiful among other wild lawn flowers in the early spring. It makes a nice alternative to the perfect golf course style lawn.

Typeperennial bulb
Zone3,4,5,6,7,8
Categoriesspring flowering bulb
Bloom Colorblue
Bloom Timeearly spring
LightFull Sun
Soilmoist, rich, well drained soil
Height4 to 8 inches
Diagnosis0
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