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Daylilies in Bloom

Good to Know
If you are unable to find the right daylily for your garden's palette, why not create your own? Daylilies are easy to hybridize and you can see the results in just a few seasons. Read more.

Daylilies are the star of the hour in my garden in early July. Carefree and adaptable these plants are ideal for those who are just starting a garden, but so pleasing that experienced gardeners love them as well.

To grow daylilies all you need is full sun to partial shade, average soil and consistent moisture. (Read more about growing daylilies.)

This year I have several new additions that I want to share with you. I hesitate to call them new because they are really old standbys, but they are new to me. I really prefer the varieties that haven't been hybridized to the point that they no longer resemble the classic daylilies I know and love and these hit the mark.

Persian Market - Deep rose color; fragrant; mid-season; very prolific; reliable rebloom; evergreen; 27-inch tall bloom scape, 7-inch blooms; introduced in 1969, zones 3 - 9
Red Ribbons - Spider daylily with long, thin petals, yellow tipped with rust; mid-season; may take several growing seasons to produce a good show; evergreen in zones 8 - 10; 42-inch bloom scape; 8-inch bloom; introduced in 1964; zones 3 ? 9
Mary Todd - Clear yellow, crimped petals; early season; semi-evergreen; very prolific; reliable rebloom; deer resistant; pest free; 22-inch bloom scape; 6-inch bloom; introduced in 1967; zones 3 - 9
Night Beacon - Chartreuse throat with purple petals; recurved petals; early season; reliable rebloom; blooms stay open at night; great for coastal and Deep South gardens; evergreen in zones 8 - 10; 27-inch tall bloom scapes; introduced in 1988; zones 3 to 9
Charles Johnston - Yellow throat with ruby petals; early season; fragrant; reliable rebloom; 24-inch tall bloom scapes; 6-inch blooms; introduced in 1981; zones 3 - 9